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Butter vs Margarine: A Guide to Better Eating

by Nikolai Nikitenko January 13, 2016

Butter vs Margarine: A Guide to Better Eating

No matter what kind of food you plan on preparing you will always need some oil. Whether for greasing up the pan so food doesn’t stick, or adding some oils into a recipe, we always want to make the healthier choice. Most people fight between using butter or margarine; but we will also go into alternative oils and what they are good for.

As we all know, butter has been around for likely all of human civilization. The creamy spread, made from cows milk has been used for many millennia by man. In the 20th century science realized that butter might not be very healthy for us. Hence began the great move from butter to other oils. One of these alternatives was margarine. Now margarine in itself is a much newer concept than the ancient recipe of butter. In the late 1800s, during the reign of Emperor Napoleon III of France, he issued a reward for any man who could find an alternative to butter that was suitable to feed the army and the poor. The reward was given to the French chemist, Hippolyte Mege-Mouries; for his creation of “oleomargarine”. Margarine would then become popular in the US during a beef shortage in the early 20th century.

The big war on butter began in the mid 20th century when there was a massive increase in hearth disease throughout the United States. After a few short studies it was theorized that saturated fats were the main culprit in the cause. So hence began the great war on fat. People began replacing foods containing saturated fats with other substances. The two big alternatives were margarine and corn oil. After a few decades of “healthy eating”, researches realized butter consumption had significantly dropped; but hearth disease was at an all time high. So what was the problem? Well firstly because saturated fats don’t affect hearth health. Even though they increase your intake of “bad” LDL Cholesterol, they still increase you intake of “good” HDL Cholesterol in the same amounts. The big issue was that people like to add a lot of sugar to their foods, and we have a huge disproportion of Omega-3 to Omega-6 intake. Since we consume so much Omega-6 it causes an imbalance in our cells and causes inflammation, which in turn




Nikolai Nikitenko
Nikolai Nikitenko

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